Author Topic: Middle Atlantic Conference  (Read 597291 times)

Offline gordonmann

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Re: Middle Atlantic Conference
« Reply #5415 on: November 28, 2011, 12:10:46 pm »
Yeah, like two of the interceptions, some of the penalties didn't have a big bearing on the game. But there was one series where Del Val had back to back encroachment penalties followed by a pass interference call. I think that's the drive where SJF scored its first touchdown.

Offline Lyco80

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Re: Middle Atlantic Conference
« Reply #5416 on: December 18, 2011, 07:49:16 pm »
Not a word on here about the Stagg Bowl - again a meeting of the two haves of D-III.  How they do it is a bit of a wonder but you have to think that success does breed success but it is still a bit of conundrum how two very different schools in enrollment and financial structure can be so dominant and it looks like there is really very little to counter the status quo anywhere near the horizon.

Today the Giants laid an egg against the Redskins - how they could be so inspired against Dallas and so lame against the Skins today is yet another mystery.  And how can the Chefs, great googly moogly, beat the Packers?  But in the NFC East:

The good news - is the door remains open, just a wee bit, for the Eagles who can yet win the division particularly if the Giants lose again and the Eagles win out - including a defeat of the Cowboys.

That would be a sweet Christmas present.

Trust all the MAC posters are snug in their beds - with dreams of sugarplums and full stockings.  Merry Christmas to all!

ATB



 

Offline PBR...

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Re: Middle Atlantic Conference
« Reply #5417 on: December 26, 2011, 04:49:25 pm »
Have to say after hearing what is in store for DVC when they go to university status shortly is very cool, even if only 1/2 of it were to come to fruition it is nothing but great things for the school. Some great things are being discussed and on the table. Wow...is all that can be said. Pretty good stuff... Happy Holidays everyone.

Offline bill

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Re: Middle Atlantic Conference
« Reply #5418 on: December 28, 2011, 11:06:52 pm »
PBR

Not trying to be negative - I really just want to know:

What difference is there if/when Del Val becomes a university? Is there some sort of change with PA rules?

I ask because most of the NJ state colleges went through all of this about 15 years ago. Once the state department of ed. relaxed the rules, everyone became a university from Willie P to Rowan.  Other than the name changes, nothing else happened!

Bill

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Re: Middle Atlantic Conference
« Reply #5419 on: December 29, 2011, 08:20:25 am »
PBR

Not trying to be negative - I really just want to know:

What difference is there if/when Del Val becomes a university? Is there some sort of change with PA rules?

I ask because most of the NJ state colleges went through all of this about 15 years ago. Once the state department of ed. relaxed the rules, everyone became a university from Willie P to Rowan.  Other than the name changes, nothing else happened!

Bill

I believe it has something to do with graduate courses being offered or the number of graduate courses being offered.

Offline Jonny "Utes" Utah

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Re: Middle Atlantic Conference
« Reply #5420 on: December 29, 2011, 01:45:43 pm »
PBR

Not trying to be negative - I really just want to know:

What difference is there if/when Del Val becomes a university? Is there some sort of change with PA rules?

I ask because most of the NJ state colleges went through all of this about 15 years ago. Once the state department of ed. relaxed the rules, everyone became a university from Willie P to Rowan.  Other than the name changes, nothing else happened!

Bill

I believe it has something to do with graduate courses being offered or the number of graduate courses being offered.

Actually the name 'university' or 'college' have no legal distinction in terms of federal or state aid anywhere.  I had attended some meetings for Western New England College when they wanted to change their name to Western New England University.  The main reason they were doing it was because of how it appears to international students who still associate 'universities' with higher education and colleges with high schools and lower level institutes of learning.  Also a universit
y is a place that has different schools within the whole school (schools of nursing, education, business, agriculture, etc.). It was clear that the school would not be getting any other legal or financial advantage with the name change.  There was some opposition but the international association along with the fact that in 100 years no one will care about the name change is what basically made it go through.


Basically some schools are universities but still call themselves colleges (Boston College, Ithaca College, Dartmouth, William and Mary).  If a college wanted to expand by adding schools and programs, then you would see some great changes at that school.

zach

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Re: Middle Atlantic Conference
« Reply #5421 on: December 29, 2011, 11:55:59 pm »
PBR

Not trying to be negative - I really just want to know:

What difference is there if/when Del Val becomes a university? Is there some sort of change with PA rules?

I ask because most of the NJ state colleges went through all of this about 15 years ago. Once the state department of ed. relaxed the rules, everyone became a university from Willie P to Rowan.  Other than the name changes, nothing else happened!

Bill

I believe it has something to do with graduate courses being offered or the number of graduate courses being offered.

Actually the name 'university' or 'college' have no legal distinction in terms of federal or state aid anywhere.  I had attended some meetings for Western New England College when they wanted to change their name to Western New England University.  The main reason they were doing it was because of how it appears to international students who still associate 'universities' with higher education and colleges with high schools and lower level institutes of learning.  Also a universit
y is a place that has different schools within the whole school (schools of nursing, education, business, agriculture, etc.). It was clear that the school would not be getting any other legal or financial advantage with the name change.  There was some opposition but the international association along with the fact that in 100 years no one will care about the name change is what basically made it go through.


Basically some schools are universities but still call themselves colleges (Boston College, Ithaca College, Dartmouth, William and Mary).  If a college wanted to expand by adding schools and programs, then you would see some great changes at that school.

Not completely true. It depends on the state. Some states it means nothing, some it does. I know that in Massachusettes and New York it means something. In Massachusettes you need a certain amount of master programs.  I don't have the number in front of me. It used to be that you needed 2 doctorate programs, but the state decided to strike that a few years ago, when they wanted to make their state colleges universities. Western New England University opened up the college of Pharmacy to fit the old requirements, only to find out that they state screwed them over and decided they only needed the lower requirements.

You are right about it being able to draw international students better. In Europe College is not the same as University. It is a step lower. In the French language, College means middle school for example. Therefore it is much easier to track international students, who do not recieve financial aide, if you are an university and not a college.

And a college has schools, university has colleges.

Offline Jonny "Utes" Utah

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Re: Middle Atlantic Conference
« Reply #5422 on: December 30, 2011, 07:59:07 am »
PBR

Not trying to be negative - I really just want to know:

What difference is there if/when Del Val becomes a university? Is there some sort of change with PA rules?

I ask because most of the NJ state colleges went through all of this about 15 years ago. Once the state department of ed. relaxed the rules, everyone became a university from Willie P to Rowan.  Other than the name changes, nothing else happened!

Bill

I believe it has something to do with graduate courses being offered or the number of graduate courses being offered.

Actually the name 'university' or 'college' have no legal distinction in terms of federal or state aid anywhere.  I had attended some meetings for Western New England College when they wanted to change their name to Western New England University.  The main reason they were doing it was because of how it appears to international students who still associate 'universities' with higher education and colleges with high schools and lower level institutes of learning.  Also a universit
y is a place that has different schools within the whole school (schools of nursing, education, business, agriculture, etc.). It was clear that the school would not be getting any other legal or financial advantage with the name change.  There was some opposition but the international association along with the fact that in 100 years no one will care about the name change is what basically made it go through.


Basically some schools are universities but still call themselves colleges (Boston College, Ithaca College, Dartmouth, William and Mary).  If a college wanted to expand by adding schools and programs, then you would see some great changes at that school.

Not completely true. It depends on the state. Some states it means nothing, some it does. I know that in Massachusettes and New York it means something. In Massachusettes you need a certain amount of master programs.  I don't have the number in front of me. It used to be that you needed 2 doctorate programs, but the state decided to strike that a few years ago, when they wanted to make their state colleges universities. Western New England University opened up the college of Pharmacy to fit the old requirements, only to find out that they state screwed them over and decided they only needed the lower requirements.

You are right about it being able to draw international students better. In Europe College is not the same as University. It is a step lower. In the French language, College means middle school for example. Therefore it is much easier to track international students, who do not recieve financial aide, if you are an university and not a college.

And a college has schools, university has colleges.

You are right, but I'm talking about the name itself, not the benefits you would get if you had graduate programs, colleges within your college, PHD programs, etc.  You can legally call your school whatever you want (Allthough the state does have to approve your name change or original name if you want to be recogonized). 

Boston College calls itself a university, and has different colleges within the college. 

Western New England did not have to change their name just because they added the pharmacy program (they already had colleges within the college and called themselves colleges from what I remember).  They also had several graduate programs before the change.
« Last Edit: December 30, 2011, 08:53:15 am by Jonny "Utes" Utah »

zach

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Re: Middle Atlantic Conference
« Reply #5423 on: January 09, 2012, 04:42:03 pm »
PBR

Not trying to be negative - I really just want to know:

What difference is there if/when Del Val becomes a university? Is there some sort of change with PA rules?

I ask because most of the NJ state colleges went through all of this about 15 years ago. Once the state department of ed. relaxed the rules, everyone became a university from Willie P to Rowan.  Other than the name changes, nothing else happened!

Bill

I believe it has something to do with graduate courses being offered or the number of graduate courses being offered.

Actually the name 'university' or 'college' have no legal distinction in terms of federal or state aid anywhere.  I had attended some meetings for Western New England College when they wanted to change their name to Western New England University.  The main reason they were doing it was because of how it appears to international students who still associate 'universities' with higher education and colleges with high schools and lower level institutes of learning.  Also a universit
y is a place that has different schools within the whole school (schools of nursing, education, business, agriculture, etc.). It was clear that the school would not be getting any other legal or financial advantage with the name change.  There was some opposition but the international association along with the fact that in 100 years no one will care about the name change is what basically made it go through.


Basically some schools are universities but still call themselves colleges (Boston College, Ithaca College, Dartmouth, William and Mary).  If a college wanted to expand by adding schools and programs, then you would see some great changes at that school.

Not completely true. It depends on the state. Some states it means nothing, some it does. I know that in Massachusettes and New York it means something. In Massachusettes you need a certain amount of master programs.  I don't have the number in front of me. It used to be that you needed 2 doctorate programs, but the state decided to strike that a few years ago, when they wanted to make their state colleges universities. Western New England University opened up the college of Pharmacy to fit the old requirements, only to find out that they state screwed them over and decided they only needed the lower requirements.

You are right about it being able to draw international students better. In Europe College is not the same as University. It is a step lower. In the French language, College means middle school for example. Therefore it is much easier to track international students, who do not recieve financial aide, if you are an university and not a college.

And a college has schools, university has colleges.

You are right, but I'm talking about the name itself, not the benefits you would get if you had graduate programs, colleges within your college, PHD programs, etc.  You can legally call your school whatever you want (Allthough the state does have to approve your name change or original name if you want to be recogonized). 

Boston College calls itself a university, and has different colleges within the college. 

Western New England did not have to change their name just because they added the pharmacy program (they already had colleges within the college and called themselves colleges from what I remember).  They also had several graduate programs before the change.

I think you misread my post. You don't get graduate programs if you become an university, or have to become an university if you add a program. WNE wanted to become an university, so they added the pharmacy program to get the requirements that they needed to become an university in the commonwealth of Massachusettes. They did have graduate programs before the change, just not enough to be an university. They had schools not colleges when they were WNEC. How can you have a college inside of a college?

Offline Jonny "Utes" Utah

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Re: Middle Atlantic Conference
« Reply #5424 on: January 09, 2012, 11:40:31 pm »
PBR

Not trying to be negative - I really just want to know:

What difference is there if/when Del Val becomes a university? Is there some sort of change with PA rules?

I ask because most of the NJ state colleges went through all of this about 15 years ago. Once the state department of ed. relaxed the rules, everyone became a university from Willie P to Rowan.  Other than the name changes, nothing else happened!

Bill

I believe it has something to do with graduate courses being offered or the number of graduate courses being offered.

Actually the name 'university' or 'college' have no legal distinction in terms of federal or state aid anywhere.  I had attended some meetings for Western New England College when they wanted to change their name to Western New England University.  The main reason they were doing it was because of how it appears to international students who still associate 'universities' with higher education and colleges with high schools and lower level institutes of learning.  Also a universit
y is a place that has different schools within the whole school (schools of nursing, education, business, agriculture, etc.). It was clear that the school would not be getting any other legal or financial advantage with the name change.  There was some opposition but the international association along with the fact that in 100 years no one will care about the name change is what basically made it go through.


Basically some schools are universities but still call themselves colleges (Boston College, Ithaca College, Dartmouth, William and Mary).  If a college wanted to expand by adding schools and programs, then you would see some great changes at that school.

Not completely true. It depends on the state. Some states it means nothing, some it does. I know that in Massachusettes and New York it means something. In Massachusettes you need a certain amount of master programs.  I don't have the number in front of me. It used to be that you needed 2 doctorate programs, but the state decided to strike that a few years ago, when they wanted to make their state colleges universities. Western New England University opened up the college of Pharmacy to fit the old requirements, only to find out that they state screwed them over and decided they only needed the lower requirements.

You are right about it being able to draw international students better. In Europe College is not the same as University. It is a step lower. In the French language, College means middle school for example. Therefore it is much easier to track international students, who do not recieve financial aide, if you are an university and not a college.

And a college has schools, university has colleges.

You are right, but I'm talking about the name itself, not the benefits you would get if you had graduate programs, colleges within your college, PHD programs, etc.  You can legally call your school whatever you want (Allthough the state does have to approve your name change or original name if you want to be recogonized). 

Boston College calls itself a university, and has different colleges within the college. 

Western New England did not have to change their name just because they added the pharmacy program (they already had colleges within the college and called themselves colleges from what I remember).  They also had several graduate programs before the change.

I think you misread my post. You don't get graduate programs if you become an university, or have to become an university if you add a program. WNE wanted to become an university, so they added the pharmacy program to get the requirements that they needed to become an university in the commonwealth of Massachusettes. They did have graduate programs before the change, just not enough to be an university. They had schools not colleges when they were WNEC. How can you have a college inside of a college?

My point was that WNEC didn't have to change their name because they added some graduate programs.  Just like Boston College or Dartmouth College didn't change their names.  Boston College has The College of Arts and Sciences within the school.  WNEC could have applied for a name change years ago.  They aren't going to get any extra benefits that Williams or Amherst couldn't get.

Offline PBR...

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Re: Middle Atlantic Conference
« Reply #5425 on: January 13, 2012, 08:35:53 am »
Interesting quotes from the president of DVC and affordability of college and especially Pell Grants...very interesting...

http://www.phillyburbs.com/news/local/the_intelligencer_news/with-biden-coming-college-presidents-debate-affordability/article_97304a51-cdae-5a34-96dc-dca51820ba36.html

Offline Knightstalker

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Re: Middle Atlantic Conference
« Reply #5426 on: January 13, 2012, 08:52:43 am »
Interesting quotes from the president of DVC and affordability of college and especially Pell Grants...very interesting...

http://www.phillyburbs.com/news/local/the_intelligencer_news/with-biden-coming-college-presidents-debate-affordability/article_97304a51-cdae-5a34-96dc-dca51820ba36.html

That is a very good article PBR.  The one thing I never see addressed when discussing college cost is how many kids going to college should not be going to college at all.  I think educators in this country need to reevaluate higher education.  Getting and education should not mean just college but too many HS educators and counselors tell kids they need to go to college to further themselves, this is a lie. Many of these kids would be better served by going to Tech high schools or tech schools after college.  Maybe the states need to invest some money into public technical schools.  This way instead of choosing between a college or a for profit school like Lincoln Tech they could go to the the State School of Technology, this way we start creating more craftsmen, tradesmen etc that are desperately needed, especially within the next 20 years or so.

"In the end we will survive rather than perish not because we accumulate comfort and luxury but because we accumulate wisdom"  Colonel Jack Jacobs US Army (Ret).

Offline jmcozenlaw

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Re: Middle Atlantic Conference
« Reply #5427 on: June 06, 2012, 07:07:08 pm »
I just wanted to express my heartfelt sympathy to the entire Delaware Valley College football family on the passing of Amadeus Hall last Friday. He was a good kid, with an infectious smile and a great personality.

Far too young :'(

RIP Amadeus with God.

Offline kate

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Re: Middle Atlantic Conference
« Reply #5428 on: June 10, 2012, 11:28:47 am »
Shout out to Lyco 80 and all the Lycoming posters - DelVal's S.I.D., Matt Levy, did a  poll listing four of the Fall football games, & asking which one are you most looking forward to.  Hands down, the winner was the Lycoming game on September 8, by 50% no less.  A distant second with 31% was Homecoming on Sept. 29 with 31%  How about that!

Offline PBR...

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Re: Middle Atlantic Conference
« Reply #5429 on: June 26, 2012, 01:08:04 pm »
No reason to waste time playing the regular season we know who will be coming out of the east...


http://athletics.delval.edu/news/2012/6/7/FB_2012lindys.aspx