Author Topic: FB: New England Small College Athletic Conference  (Read 2960925 times)

Offline ColbyFootball

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Re: FB: New England Small College Athletic Conference
« Reply #16950 on: May 22, 2020, 12:50:51 pm »
Hi there -- I think to equate the measures being taken as demanding zero risk is a false equivalency. Obviously zero risk is unattainable, but lowering the risk is certainly possible, and it's what is being done.

Now, obviously there are different ways to mitigate risk, and nobody has prohibited people from going into grocery stores, at least not long-term, or from leaving their houses at all, but there is a wide range of what people believe are "reasonable safety restrictions."

One thing for sure -- the virus cares not what people's opinions are of safety restrictions. It moves when people move and transmit it to other people.
I’m basically on the same page as you. But, you have some government officials that are suggesting we need to have  zero, or near zero risk. For instance, within the past week Governor Murphy of NJ said things will not get back to the “new normal”, let alone normal, until we have a vaccine or treatments. Problem is we may never have either, and we’re certainly not likely to have either soon. So I again state that the schools can and should formulate adequate plans to open an operate in person, including sports and activities.

Offline jknezek

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Re: FB: New England Small College Athletic Conference
« Reply #16951 on: May 22, 2020, 01:21:09 pm »
Hi there -- I think to equate the measures being taken as demanding zero risk is a false equivalency. Obviously zero risk is unattainable, but lowering the risk is certainly possible, and it's what is being done.

Now, obviously there are different ways to mitigate risk, and nobody has prohibited people from going into grocery stores, at least not long-term, or from leaving their houses at all, but there is a wide range of what people believe are "reasonable safety restrictions."

One thing for sure -- the virus cares not what people's opinions are of safety restrictions. It moves when people move and transmit it to other people.
I’m basically on the same page as you. But, you have some government officials that are suggesting we need to have  zero, or near zero risk. For instance, within the past week Governor Murphy of NJ said things will not get back to the “new normal”, let alone normal, until we have a vaccine or treatments. Problem is we may never have either, and we’re certainly not likely to have either soon. So I again state that the schools can and should formulate adequate plans to open an operate in person, including sports and activities.

I actually agree with Governor Murphy. Things will not go back to normal. But how close they get is in the interpretation. It's like 9/11. We NEVER went back to a pre-9/11 normal, witness all the extra precautions when getting on an airplane or in and out of a major office building in NYC. But we adapt and move forward. I think that will be the same with this virus. Non-pandemic normal means going back to a time when this was unthinkable. That will, hopefully, never happen again.

Most people will be more aware of their personal space and giving it when possible. Most people will be more aware of being around people who are sick, and sick people will, hopefully, be less likely to "push through" their illness as opposed to taking a day off. Hopefully employers will adapt to a "new normal" where they don't punish employees for taking sick leave. People will be more aware of washing hands and good hygiene (as sad as it is that it took a pandemic to do so). There will be more. For example I think schools will adapt to a new normal that involves more cleaning and more space. It will be expensive, but it needs to be done. Hopefully taxpayers will approve it. Public transit will need to adapt, quickly, to the need for a cleaner environment. As will office buildings, the debate over elevator cleanliness is an interesting one to watch. I wouldn't be surprised to see the return of "doormen" in elevators in high density buildings.

So pre-pandemic normal is NOT returning in lots of ways. I expect serve yourself buffet restaurants are all but finished as a business model, though I could be wrong.

But people who equate "not normal" with this shutdown continuing indefinitely are simply reading into what isn't there. New normal is more along the changes, and inconveniences, that happen with disturbing events. If we return to what was, we learned nothing. That would be a very sad outcome. So I'm pleased when people acknowledge that pre-pandemic normal is not returning and it frustrates me when people think it has to. That just means we, as a society, have failed to adapt to a new challenge. Of course, I'm not always pleased with the "new normal" measures. We don't always get them right. But doing something to prevent a re-occurrence of a significant bad outcome is a good sign.

Hiding your head in the sand and wishing for things to go back to what they were before, without acknowledging that it contributed to the harm done and needs to be fixed, is a poor use of the intelligence we have, sometimes, been graced with as a species. 

Offline Pat Coleman

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Re: FB: New England Small College Athletic Conference
« Reply #16952 on: May 22, 2020, 03:23:42 pm »
With everything like this -- whether it is a pronouncement by a governor, a scientist or a college or university about its fall plans -- I think we would all benefit by taking it with a grain of salt.
  • This is a new virus.
  • None of us has lived through a pandemic like this before.
  • Everyone is learning (or has the opportunity to, I guess).
  • Things will change.
  • And things will change again.
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Offline ColbyFootball

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Re: FB: New England Small College Athletic Conference
« Reply #16953 on: May 22, 2020, 08:24:19 pm »
Hi there -- I think to equate the measures being taken as demanding zero risk is a false equivalency. Obviously zero risk is unattainable, but lowering the risk is certainly possible, and it's what is being done.

Now, obviously there are different ways to mitigate risk, and nobody has prohibited people from going into grocery stores, at least not long-term, or from leaving their houses at all, but there is a wide range of what people believe are "reasonable safety restrictions."

One thing for sure -- the virus cares not what people's opinions are of safety restrictions. It moves when people move and transmit it to other people.
I’m basically on the same page as you. But, you have some government officials that are suggesting we need to have  zero, or near zero risk. For instance, within the past week Governor Murphy of NJ said things will not get back to the “new normal”, let alone normal, until we have a vaccine or treatments. Problem is we may never have either, and we’re certainly not likely to have either soon. So I again state that the schools can and should formulate adequate plans to open an operate in person, including sports and activities.

I actually agree with Governor Murphy. Things will not go back to normal. But how close they get is in the interpretation. It's like 9/11. We NEVER went back to a pre-9/11 normal, witness all the extra precautions when getting on an airplane or in and out of a major office building in NYC. But we adapt and move forward. I think that will be the same with this virus. Non-pandemic normal means going back to a time when this was unthinkable. That will, hopefully, never happen again.

Most people will be more aware of their personal space and giving it when possible. Most people will be more aware of being around people who are sick, and sick people will, hopefully, be less likely to "push through" their illness as opposed to taking a day off. Hopefully employers will adapt to a "new normal" where they don't punish employees for taking sick leave. People will be more aware of washing hands and good hygiene (as sad as it is that it took a pandemic to do so). There will be more. For example I think schools will adapt to a new normal that involves more cleaning and more space. It will be expensive, but it needs to be done. Hopefully taxpayers will approve it. Public transit will need to adapt, quickly, to the need for a cleaner environment. As will office buildings, the debate over elevator cleanliness is an interesting one to watch. I wouldn't be surprised to see the return of "doormen" in elevators in high density buildings.

So pre-pandemic normal is NOT returning in lots of ways. I expect serve yourself buffet restaurants are all but finished as a business model, though I could be wrong.

But people who equate "not normal" with this shutdown continuing indefinitely are simply reading into what isn't there. New normal is more along the changes, and inconveniences, that happen with disturbing events. If we return to what was, we learned nothing. That would be a very sad outcome. So I'm pleased when people acknowledge that pre-pandemic normal is not returning and it frustrates me when people think it has to. That just means we, as a society, have failed to adapt to a new challenge. Of course, I'm not always pleased with the "new normal" measures. We don't always get them right. But doing something to prevent a re-occurrence of a significant bad outcome is a good sign.

Hiding your head in the sand and wishing for things to go back to what they were before, without acknowledging that it contributed to the harm done and needs to be fixed, is a poor use of the intelligence we have, sometimes, been graced with as a species.
I lived through 9/11 in a very intimate way. Life has never been the same. So to say that things will change after this crisis passes is absolutely accurate. And, I do not hide my head in the sand over anything. Change in life is inevitable under the best of circumstances. But when I hear we must have a “new normal”, I fear drastic changes will be forced on us. For instance, I can’t imagine being forced to wear a mask in public will be the “new normal”. But such attempts are not beyond the possible, perhaps even probable.

Offline Oline89

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Re: FB: New England Small College Athletic Conference
« Reply #16954 on: May 23, 2020, 01:35:11 pm »
Hi there -- I think to equate the measures being taken as demanding zero risk is a false equivalency. Obviously zero risk is unattainable, but lowering the risk is certainly possible, and it's what is being done.

Now, obviously there are different ways to mitigate risk, and nobody has prohibited people from going into grocery stores, at least not long-term, or from leaving their houses at all, but there is a wide range of what people believe are "reasonable safety restrictions."

One thing for sure -- the virus cares not what people's opinions are of safety restrictions. It moves when people move and transmit it to other people.
I’m basically on the same page as you. But, you have some government officials that are suggesting we need to have  zero, or near zero risk. For instance, within the past week Governor Murphy of NJ said things will not get back to the “new normal”, let alone normal, until we have a vaccine or treatments. Problem is we may never have either, and we’re certainly not likely to have either soon. So I again state that the schools can and should formulate adequate plans to open an operate in person, including sports and activities.

I actually agree with Governor Murphy. Things will not go back to normal. But how close they get is in the interpretation. It's like 9/11. We NEVER went back to a pre-9/11 normal, witness all the extra precautions when getting on an airplane or in and out of a major office building in NYC. But we adapt and move forward. I think that will be the same with this virus. Non-pandemic normal means going back to a time when this was unthinkable. That will, hopefully, never happen again.

Most people will be more aware of their personal space and giving it when possible. Most people will be more aware of being around people who are sick, and sick people will, hopefully, be less likely to "push through" their illness as opposed to taking a day off. Hopefully employers will adapt to a "new normal" where they don't punish employees for taking sick leave. People will be more aware of washing hands and good hygiene (as sad as it is that it took a pandemic to do so). There will be more. For example I think schools will adapt to a new normal that involves more cleaning and more space. It will be expensive, but it needs to be done. Hopefully taxpayers will approve it. Public transit will need to adapt, quickly, to the need for a cleaner environment. As will office buildings, the debate over elevator cleanliness is an interesting one to watch. I wouldn't be surprised to see the return of "doormen" in elevators in high density buildings.

So pre-pandemic normal is NOT returning in lots of ways. I expect serve yourself buffet restaurants are all but finished as a business model, though I could be wrong.

But people who equate "not normal" with this shutdown continuing indefinitely are simply reading into what isn't there. New normal is more along the changes, and inconveniences, that happen with disturbing events. If we return to what was, we learned nothing. That would be a very sad outcome. So I'm pleased when people acknowledge that pre-pandemic normal is not returning and it frustrates me when people think it has to. That just means we, as a society, have failed to adapt to a new challenge. Of course, I'm not always pleased with the "new normal" measures. We don't always get them right. But doing something to prevent a re-occurrence of a significant bad outcome is a good sign.

Hiding your head in the sand and wishing for things to go back to what they were before, without acknowledging that it contributed to the harm done and needs to be fixed, is a poor use of the intelligence we have, sometimes, been graced with as a species.
I lived through 9/11 in a very intimate way. Life has never been the same. So to say that things will change after this crisis passes is absolutely accurate. And, I do not hide my head in the sand over anything. Change in life is inevitable under the best of circumstances. But when I hear we must have a “new normal”, I fear drastic changes will be forced on us. For instance, I can’t imagine being forced to wear a mask in public will be the “new normal”. But such attempts are not beyond the possible, perhaps even probable.

Honestly, there is very little to compare the current pandemic crisis to 9/11.  The threat of global terrorism is as real today as it was in 2001.  The novel Corona virus will slowly disappear over the next 2 years.  A better comparison would be the HIV crisis of the 1980's.  Since that crisis, there have been dramatic changes in the way we handle blood products, perform medical procedures, practice safe sex, etc.  After this crisis passes, we will wash our hands more frequently, use cleaning products on a regular basis in public areas, however, there are not going to be the cultural/societal changes we continue to experience since 9/11

Offline Pat Coleman

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Re: FB: New England Small College Athletic Conference
« Reply #16955 on: May 23, 2020, 03:10:33 pm »
... we hope.
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Offline amh63

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Re: FB: New England Small College Athletic Conference
« Reply #16956 on: May 23, 2020, 03:43:56 pm »
You never know what the “new norm” is when it seems to change every week...due to federal, state, local gov’t setting up guidelines, etc. 
Several interesting sports/football stories today in the WSJ.  First one is wrt the big div1 football conferences planning to start up football in the Fall.  Still within a conference there are some state schools that have conflicts with state gov’t present rules.  In the SEC, the lone private school member...Vandy74’s alma Mater...is not completely in yet.  The NCAA has little say on the matter.  TV and the big powerhouse conferences are in control.  Who controls the “money” will dictate :)
Second article on the sports page has to do with Golf and Football.  Seems there will be a golf match combing big football star QBs with golf legends in Florida on Sunday TV.  To help out the Pandemic fight.
The senior retired Manning brother...former QB great.. will join up with Tiger Woods in a match against Tom Brady and Phil Mickerson.  That’s Brady, the QB for Tampa Bay...I believe.  Seems Brady is a great putter and Manning is a better long ball hitter.  Both football players are fine golfers with Manning having the lower handicap.  I will watch the match...hoping to hear the live chatter going on.
« Last Edit: May 23, 2020, 03:57:59 pm by amh63 »

Offline jamtod

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Re: FB: New England Small College Athletic Conference
« Reply #16957 on: May 23, 2020, 03:53:43 pm »
... we hope.
And even then, returning to normal assumes we have vaccine or treatment and this isn't running rampant anymore.