Author Topic: Advice for college recruit  (Read 6288 times)

Offline mom in the stands

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Advice for college recruit
« on: September 09, 2008, 03:40:23 pm »
Our daughter has been a top, dedicated athlete in both Volleyball and Basketball for her high school. She played volleyball club and we are tied into the vb college scene. Trouble is she has decided -- late as she is a senior -- that she wants to play basketball in college. She never played club basketball so we are out of the loop on the best Western D3 opportunities.  I would appreciate any advice you may be able to offer to get us started. We'd also love any insight you may have on programs in the Western US -- she prefers to stay out west, preferably the northwest.

Offline Ralph Turner

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Re: Advice for college recruit
« Reply #1 on: September 09, 2008, 04:52:51 pm »
Welcome!

Great schools and great programs in the Northwest Conference!

Here is the link on this board to the conference.  Click here.

Offline Flying Dutch

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Re: Advice for college recruit
« Reply #2 on: September 09, 2008, 05:13:25 pm »
As Hope College (Michigan) fans and parents our experience is very limited, but we did have the opportunity to meet George Fox's coach at the NCAA tournament in Texas.  He, his team and fans were a class act - and the program is very successful.  I think I would be very happy to see my child at Fox and  in that program - if I lived in the NW. They play a high level of D3 basketball, as do several of the northwest teams from what I hear, so your daughter should be prepared for a competitive situation.

The lack of club / AAU exprience is not an impossible obstacle to overcome.  Our daughter went the same route (including no contact with college coaches prior to her senior year) and it has worked out.  However, it would be helpful if your daughter has played in a competitive high school conference and has sound skills.

Start contacting schools now!  Check the recruit section most schools have on their athletic web sites.  Be prepared to provide stats and game dvds if possible.  It will give the coaches a chance to  keep track of her this season.  Remember that D3 schools are generally looking for solid students that will perform academically as well as athletically.

Good Luck

Offline Gray Fox

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Re: Advice for college recruit
« Reply #3 on: September 14, 2008, 10:36:24 pm »
Don't overlook the SCIAC schools in the Southern California area.

  http://www.thesciac.org/sports/wbkb/index
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Offline Bird Dog

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Re: Advice for college recruit
« Reply #4 on: February 07, 2010, 12:32:07 pm »
All I will say is do not send your daughter to Pacific Lutheran University.  It is the land of double standards.  But if your daughter is 20% shooter who gets constantly beat to the basket, this may be your best bet.

Can I assume your daughter is playing behind this person who's a chose one (big donor, coaches daughter, employee of the school, a chemistry fit,, coaches perogative).   My guess is you are not alone in any AAU, Jr. High, High School, Prep School, J.C., Naia, and all divisions of NCAA it happens.    


Offline Just Bill

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Re: Advice for college recruit
« Reply #5 on: February 07, 2010, 04:25:50 pm »
The best thing I could tell you (or any parent of a college basketball player) is to stay out if it.  These aren't little kids anymore.  They are young adults and should handle their own problems.  Support your daughter, but it's up to her to confront the situation.

Psychologically harmful?  Please.  If your daughter hasn't figured out that sometimes life isn't fair and sometimes hard work isn't rewarded then she needs poke her head out of the ground a look around once in a while.  I doubt that's the case.  She'll be fine.  No basketball coach is going to do lasting damage to an 18-22 year old unless they let her.

And remember. You only get the version of events filtered through your daughter's perception.  And if she's like 99% of the rest of us out there, that's only a portion of the complete picture.  You're not at practice.  You're not on the bus.  You're not in the locker room.  You only know what she tells you about her own actions, her teammates actions and her coach's actions.  No matter how much you feel like you have the whole story, you don't.

Trust me and stay out of it.  Let her fight her own battles.  You and your daughter will be better off in the long run regardless of what happens in the PLU basketball program.
« Last Edit: February 07, 2010, 04:29:44 pm by Just Bill »
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Offline Just Bill

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Re: Advice for college recruit
« Reply #6 on: February 07, 2010, 04:35:32 pm »
mom in the stands,

Don't want your thread to get hijacked.  Your kid sounds like she was made for the Northwest Conference.  There's some othe NAIA schools up there, but I'm not about to plug those over the NWC.  See which NWC schools have your daughters area of academic interest and start e-mail or calling coaches.  D-III coaches won't care if you contact them early or late, they just want you to contact them!
"That seems silly and pointless..." - Hoops Fan

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Offline Title9Fan

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Re: Advice for college recruit
« Reply #7 on: February 22, 2010, 05:32:57 pm »
She's obviously a freshman somewhere by now.....

Bills' comments are still useful to anyone interested in the subject.

I would also add that it's not a good idea (although this is entirely a matter of personal opinion) to select a D3 program based on a sport.  Depending on the level of competitiveness, some D3 teams require big time commitments from the players, both in and out of season, and --- depending on tuition, an expensive commitment from the parents (in some D3 schools a 4 year tuition plus r&b is $52K). There's no full ride....so (again, IMO) make sure your kid chooses the school they want to attend for thier academic interests and abilities....and any other criteria they've decided is important to their college experience....not exclusively because they like a sports team.

I'd also suggest checking on the coach in-depth.  How long have they been there?  Coaching staff turn-over is high in D3 programs.  Another reason to make sure the selection factors are weighted and balanced. 

I'd also suggest that there's a big difference between 17 (when they make the college choice usually --sometimes even 16) and 21 or 22 years of age.  YMMV depending upon each and every teen/young adult.  But stepping back sequentially is advised.  It's a lot like a football game.  A few yards at a time on the ground....a long pass when it feels right....and then if it's all working, just an adjustment or two at the half...  ultimately avoids the need for a hail mary....